Delaney In the Media


350 Attend Miami Premiere of Climate-Change Documentary

350 attend miami premiere of climate-change documentary

As South Floridians begin to awaken to the reality of King Tides, salty street flooding, and the emerging impact of sea-level rise on their communities, more than 350 residents gathered for a special premiere of National Geographic’s documentary Gathering Storm.

The Miami-based episode of Season Two of NatGeo’s award-winning series, Years of Living Dangerously, was screened before a full house at Little Havana’s Tower Theater on Oct. 27. Starring Hollywood actor/musician Jack Black, the film focuses on Miami’s plight from global warming and sea-level rise.


  A Future So Bright: Meet the Prize-Winning Young People Working Toward a Greener, Better Tomorrow

A Future So Bright: Meet the Prize-Winning Young People Working Toward a Greener, Better Tomorrow

A future so bright: meet the prize-winning young people working toward a greener, better tomorrow

By: Katie O'Reilly

Delaney Reynolds, who grew up in Miami and No Name Key, a 1,000-acre island in the Florida Keys, became concerned about sea-level rise at an early age. So, she founded The Sink or Swim Project to educate and engage young South Floridians in political action around climate change. “Kids get it,” says Reynolds, who last year mobilized Miami-Dade County to appoint its first-ever chief sustainability officer, and who’s currently working with the mayor of South Miami to implement an ordinance requiring solar power on new and renovated buildings.


  Climate Change Puts Focus on Miami

Climate Change Puts Focus on Miami

climate change puts focus on miami

By: Jessica M. Castillo, University of Miami News

With over $3 billion worth of property at risk for climate change effects, it’s no wonder Miami and UM’s renowned climate scientists Ben Kirtman and Hal Wanless are featured in season two of the acclaimed National Geographic series Years of Living Dangerously.

Kirtman, professor of atmospheric sciences and director of the Cooperative Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Studies at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, and Wanless, professor and chair of the geological science at the College of Arts and Sciences, left Jack Black speechless when they displayed their latest climate science data. The worst estimates show most of Miami completely inundated by the end of the century.


  National Geographic Climate-Change Documentary Screens in Little Havana's Tower Theater

National Geographic Climate-Change Documentary Screens in Little Havana's Tower Theater

National Geographic climate-change documentary screns in litle havana's tower theater

By: Miami Herald Staff

In the wake of the annual sunny-day flooding during king tides in South Florida, more than 350 residents recently gathered for a screening of a National Geographic documentary on climate change.

The Miami-based episode of season two of NatGeo’s series “Years of Living Dangerously” was screened before a full house at Little Havana’s Tower Theater on Oct. 27. The episode, starring actor/musician Jack Black as a correspondent exploring the local sentiment on sea level rise, focuses on the region’s vulnerability amid global warming and sea-level rise.


  Delaney Reynolds participates in Our Ocean's One Future Leadership Summit

Delaney Reynolds participates in Our Ocean's One Future Leadership Summit

Delaney Reynolds participates in our ocean's one future leadership summit

By: Community News

Delaney Reynolds headed off to Washington D.C. in mid-September for John Kerry and the State Department’s Our Ocean’s One Future Leadership Summit. She’s attending as part of Phillipe Cousteau’s EarthEcho organization for which she was selected earlier this year as one of his 12 global Young Leaders.

EarthEcho’s Youth Leadership Council is comprised of young environmental leaders from across the country, ages 15-22. Delaney Reynolds, a senior at Miami’s Palmer Trinity School, is well known for having founded The Sink or Swim Project and its WWW.miamisearise.com as well as her highly regarded Tedx Talk on global warming and sea level rise.


  Red carpet premiere of ‘Gathering Storm’ fills the house at Tower Theater, Oct. 27

Red carpet premiere of ‘Gathering Storm’ fills the house at Tower Theater, Oct. 27

Red carpet premiere of ‘Gathering Storm’ fills the house at Tower Theater, Oct. 27

By: Bill Kress, Community Newspapers

The Sink or Swim Project (www.miamisearise.com) and The CLEO Institute (www.cleoinstitute.org) are hosting a World Premiere of the Years of Living Dangerously episode, entitled Gathering Storm, Oct. 27 at Miami’s Tower Theater. The film features Jack Black, Ian Somerhalder, and Nikki Reed from Season 2 of the acclaimed National Geographic series. The event sold out quickly, however, streaming video coverage of the red-carpet reception and key interviews with program personalities is being provided live on Facebook directly from the event venue.


 National Award Inspires America's Youth To Make A Difference

National Award Inspires America's Youth To Make A Difference

National Award Inspires America's Youth To Make A Difference

By: PRNewswire for YAHOO! News

Every person, regardless of age, can help to make the world a better place. The Gloria Barron Prize for Young Heroes names this year's winners as it continues to celebrate inspiring, public-spirited young people from diverse backgrounds all across North America. Established in 2001 by author T.A. Barron, the Barron Prize annually honors 25 outstanding young leaders ages 8 to 18 who have made a significant positive impact on people, their communities, and the environment. The top fifteen winners each receive $5,000 to support their service work or higher education.

"Nothing is more inspiring than stories about heroic people who have truly made a difference to the world," says Barron. "The goal of the Barron Prize is to shine the spotlight on these amazing young people so that their example will encourage others to take action."


By: Philippe Cousteau

Ocean acidification. Plastic pollution. Overfishing. Sea level rise. When it comes to the challenges facing our ocean, it’s easy to become overwhelmed. As a frequent witness to these issues, I, too, am often distraught over this dire state of affairs; reminded that we are in desperate need of problem solvers and innovators who aren’t afraid to take bold action, and who aren’t encumbered by political or financial agendas. The good news for all of us is that these environmental and ocean champions exist in growing numbers. They are committed, focused, formidable, and many of them haven’t even graduated from high school. The bad news is that we as an ocean conservation community largely continue to ignore this powerful constituency.